Pollution and Clean Stove

Pollution and Clean Stove

Awareness project, Clean stove project, Education project
Smoke from Cooking: A Global Health Threat Imagine coming home to a house filled with so much smoke that you can barely see across the room. This is the reality for 2.8 billion people around the world who rely on polluting fuels to meet their basic energy needs (WHO IRIS). This is Lhamotso. Every time Lhamotso cooks a meal, she puts her family at risk of death and disease. Indeed, in 2012 the World Health Organization identified household air pollution from cooking fires as one of the biggest global health threats, causing 4.3 million premature deaths per year (WHO 2012). See map.  Which cooking fuels are polluting and which are clean?   The most polluting fuels are solid fuels like: coal, wood, charcoal, dung, and crop residues (key pollutants include:…
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Solar Cooking Pilot Project in Haiti

Solar Cooking Pilot Project in Haiti

Clean stove project, Community project
  In 2015, together with Solar Electric Light Fund and Solar Household Energy (SHE), we at One Earth Designs started a project in Tilori, Haiti - a small rural community on the Dominican Republic border. The project’s goal was to bring 25 SolSource solar stoves to Tilori and teach residents how to use them to replace traditional cooking methods. Tilori, with a population of fewer than 5,000 people, sits on the border of Haiti and the Dominican Republic. It was selected for this pilot project because its inhabitants are the principal users of the forest of Sabana Clara--a remnant mix of pine and broadleaf forest. Biodiversity like Sabana Clara’s plays an important role in the restoration of Haiti’s degraded ecosystems.     Haiti suffers from severe deforestation and consequent land erosion.…
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Fighting Air Pollution in Rural China

Fighting Air Pollution in Rural China

Clean stove project, Community project
  In 2007, while studying chemistry at Wellesley College, I traveled to the Himalayan Plateau to study climate change. As usual, however, I decided to add my own little science experiment into the mix. I took air quality monitors with me and literally wore them on my body as I traveled across China. I thought that the air pollution levels I measured in Beijing and other large cities were already very high. Then, I arrived in the Himalayas and had an experience that shook the foundations of my assumptions about air pollution and health. A local family invited me into their home. When I told them I was studying “smoke in the sky”, everyone burst out laughing. “The sky is so blue”, they replied, “why study that when there is…
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